Public school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 19:59:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://fpru.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/favicon-1-150x150.png Public school – FPRU http://fpru.org/ 32 32 South Heart Public School Expands Supported Silent Reading Program https://fpru.org/south-heart-public-school-expands-supported-silent-reading-program/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 19:59:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/south-heart-public-school-expands-supported-silent-reading-program/ At the start of this school year, South Heart Public School expanded its high school-supported Silent Reading (SSR) program to all of its classrooms. South Heart Elementary School principal Jessica Geis said from 8:30 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. everyone in the class, including teachers and para-educators, spent the first 20 minutes of their day. to […]]]>

At the start of this school year, South Heart Public School expanded its high school-supported Silent Reading (SSR) program to all of its classrooms. South Heart Elementary School principal Jessica Geis said from 8:30 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. everyone in the class, including teachers and para-educators, spent the first 20 minutes of their day. to read.

“It started because we were trying to find a time for collaboration between teachers, and also to get students to read more. And our high school has been doing RSS for a few years. So we took the opportunity to create a school-wide SSR block, ”said Geis. “Essentially, it’s about asking students to choose the books they want to read.

The most recent program adds to a school system that remains one of the best performing schools in the state, ranking 8th out of 163 schools in the state according to a US News and World Report list.

Geis explained that some of the younger students, like those in Kindergarten and Grade 1, are not quite ready for a full 20 minutes of independent reading, so this period is used as story time when a teacher, para-educator or guest speaker reads aloud. .

Reading has long been proven to improve understanding and performance in students. In a study conducted at Emory University, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan students’ brains before and after reading. In the days following the reading, they discovered increased connectivity in areas of the brain involved in receptivity to language, as well as in physical sensations and movement.

South Heart’s fifth-grade teacher Leah Miller said the program has improved the learning environment in multiple ways. She said students love the first 20 minutes of their day and it shapes them to be lifelong learners.

“It allowed every student from Kindergarten to Grade 12 to be immersed in books. I saw an improvement in endurance, an increase in comprehension and really just love of reading, ”Miller said. “It’s so good, and they’re so focused.”

She stressed the importance of using the program to set a good example.

“Another thing that’s been really wonderful for the kids to see is that the adults (also read). I mean, we can tell them it’s important to read, but we sit down with them, ”Miller said. “It’s important that children see this.

On Wednesdays, that time is typically used to collaborate with the other fifth-grade teacher on successful teaching strategies, she said.

“These are days when we talk about how we can tailor instruction to the needs of students, what we need to look at differently and what we do that is successful,” Miller said. “So we come together as a team… really looking at how we build them and develop them to become successful adults. “


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‘Rocky Roads Ahead’ As Almost All New Edmonton Public School Trustees Pledge To Fight Alberta Over K-6 Curriculum Project https://fpru.org/rocky-roads-ahead-as-almost-all-new-edmonton-public-school-trustees-pledge-to-fight-alberta-over-k-6-curriculum-project/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 01:02:15 +0000 https://fpru.org/rocky-roads-ahead-as-almost-all-new-edmonton-public-school-trustees-pledge-to-fight-alberta-over-k-6-curriculum-project/ Breadcrumb Links Local News Author of the article: Lauren Boothby Edmonton Public School Education Center. Photo by David Bloom /Postmedia, file Content of the article Almost all of Edmonton’s new school trustees have spoken out strongly against Alberta’s controversial K-6 curriculum proposal ahead of Monday’s election, setting the stage for a battle with the province […]]]>

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Almost all of Edmonton’s new school trustees have spoken out strongly against Alberta’s controversial K-6 curriculum proposal ahead of Monday’s election, setting the stage for a battle with the province over what is the better for student education.

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Eight of nine Edmonton public school trustees told the Support Our Students (SOS) advocacy group in a pre-election survey they do not support the program as it is and will oppose it. Ninth Administrator Dawn Hancock did not respond to SOS – or a Postmedia request for comment for this story – but to a statement on his site says the program has problems, that it will advocate for affected parents and support the teachers involved in the process with their recommendations.

With the return of just two incumbents, the newcomers will be in a difficult position given the government’s antagonistic approach to school boards from the start of her tenure, according to outgoing school trustee Bridget Stirling. The council also opposed the government, pushing for a rewrite of the program earlier this year and withdraw to steer the project.

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“It’s a really tough place. I think we have seen a trend over the past couple of years of a government that is not interested in dialogue. And so I think the directors are going to have to be ready to continue to take fairly strong positions, ”she said.

Administrators will also have to deal with the finalized Kindergarten to Grade 6 curriculum if the government proposes it next fall, without local schools having a chance to test it.

“They won’t be able to refuse the implementation, and there is a lot of concern about the implications for students,” Stirling said.

The majority of school divisions in Alberta have chosen not to pilot the interim curriculum, including Edmonton Catholic Schools . Participating divisions began testing last month.

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University of Alberta social science expert Carla Peck, who has been heavily critical of the project, expects to see a conflict between Edmonton public school administrators and the province.

“I think there might be some rocky roads ahead of us. When you have pretty much an entire board of directors, where almost all the members are in the same position with regard to the curriculum, and who oppose the curriculum as it is currently written, then the minister will face a certain setback when it is time to implement it, ”she said.

She is happy to see that so many directors have pledged to oppose it, but says the new board still needs to be strong in advocating for the changes. “It would be easy for the government to say, ‘That’s the old council’s point of view and maybe the new council doesn’t.’ “

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Nicole Sparrow, spokesperson for Education Minister Adriana LaGrange, said the government has always made it clear that it wants comments on the program, noting its engagement process is currently in progress. She hopes Edmonton public schools will participate.

“With many new school trustees elected across the province, we look forward to continuing this collaborative work to strengthen the interim curriculum,” she said in an email.

Sparrow also pointed out that the K-6 working group included around 100 teachers and that 380 teachers are currently involved in the pilot project.

“Teachers have been and will continue to be involved every step of the way as we continue the one-year review process,” she said.

SOS spokesman Wing Li said the election was a de facto referendum on the draft program and hoped administrators would advocate sending it back for a complete rewrite: “It is clear that the program was the one of the main problems so people have talked.

The Alberta Teachers’ Association also reiterated its criticism of the project ahead of the election, calling it unsuitable for classrooms.

lboothby@postmedia.com

@laurby

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Former Jackson Public School Band Volunteer Sentenced to 40 Years for Producing Child Pornography – Picayune Item https://fpru.org/former-jackson-public-school-band-volunteer-sentenced-to-40-years-for-producing-child-pornography-picayune-item/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 20:12:46 +0000 https://fpru.org/former-jackson-public-school-band-volunteer-sentenced-to-40-years-for-producing-child-pornography-picayune-item/ According to court documents, Jerrell Lea’Shun Jackson, 34, used his association with Jackson State University Sonic Boom to lure unsuspecting minors into his apartment and the bus station for sexually explicit driving and filming. Jackson preyed on the most vulnerable children by repairing their band’s instruments, driving them home after band rehearsals, and buying them […]]]>

According to court documents, Jerrell Lea’Shun Jackson, 34, used his association with Jackson State University Sonic Boom to lure unsuspecting minors into his apartment and the bus station for sexually explicit driving and filming. Jackson preyed on the most vulnerable children by repairing their band’s instruments, driving them home after band rehearsals, and buying them food.

Jackson pleaded guilty on June 14, 2021, to producing child pornography.

The case was investigated by the Jackson Federal Bureau of Investigation Child Exploitation and Human Trafficking Task Force, the Mississippi Attorney General’s Office, and the Jackson Public School Campus Enforcement. .

Assistant U.S. Attorney Glenda R. Haynes continued the case.

This case was brought up as part of the Safe Childhood Project, a national initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Led by the United States Prosecutor’s Offices and the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section of the Criminal Division, Project Safe Childhood brings together federal, state and local resources to locate, apprehend and prosecute those who sexually exploit children, and to identify and rescue victims. For more information on the Safe Childhood Project, please visit www.usdoj.gov/psc.


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Texas House Passes Bill Limiting Public School Athletes To Teams That Match Their Birth Sex https://fpru.org/texas-house-passes-bill-limiting-public-school-athletes-to-teams-that-match-their-birth-sex/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 06:05:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/texas-house-passes-bill-limiting-public-school-athletes-to-teams-that-match-their-birth-sex/ After more than ten hours of debate, the Texas House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday evening requiring transgender athletes in public schools to compete on teams that match their birth sex, not the gender they were born into. identify. The controversial bill, which passed 76 to 54 votes, is now going to the state […]]]>

After more than ten hours of debate, the Texas House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday evening requiring transgender athletes in public schools to compete on teams that match their birth sex, not the gender they were born into. identify. The controversial bill, which passed 76 to 54 votes, is now going to the state Senate.

Introduced by Representative Valoree Swanson, the measure restricts athletes from playing on teams that match the biological sex shown on an official birth certificate issued at or around the time of the student’s birth. An amended birth certificate would only be accepted if it had been amended “to correct a clerical error,” says the bill.

Male transgender athletes would only be allowed to play on men’s teams if there were no other options available for the sport.

Supporters of the bill claimed Thursday that transgender women would have an unfair competitive advantage over biologically female athletes at birth.

texas-state-rep-valoree-swanson-on-101421-sponsor-of-bill-limiting-public-school-transgender-student-athletes.jpg
Texas State Representative Valoree Swanson during the October 14, 2021 debate on the bill she introduced restricting transgender athletes in public schools to compete on teams that match their gender at birth.

CBS Dallas


Swanson said the bill was inspired by discrimination against organic female athletes. She highlighted what she said was an increase in demands on the state University Interschool League to take action on this discrimination.

“It’s about girls and protecting our UIL sports,” Swanson said. “I am delighted that we have the opportunity today to stand up for our daughters, our granddaughters and all of our daughters in Texas.”

Critics called the legislation an “immoral and hateful bill” that attacks transgender people, and rebuffed claims of an increase in UIL’s demands for action, saying there had been no complaint.

“How can you say girls are unfairly positioned competing in the state of Texas to justify this bill (when) there hasn’t been a single complaint” to UIL about transgender athletes in competition, ”asked Representative Julie Johnson.

“This bill is petty, inherently discriminatory and harms the children of Texas,” said State Representative John Bucy III.

The Texas ACLU was quick to weigh in:

State Representative Erin Zwiener, who also spoke out against the bill, said on Thursday that efforts to “protect transgender children” were underway.



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Optimizing Public School Spending | Harvard Review https://fpru.org/optimizing-public-school-spending-harvard-review/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 19:29:39 +0000 https://fpru.org/optimizing-public-school-spending-harvard-review/ Anyone who follows the elections in her local community is familiar with the heated debate over public school spending. What funding do schools need? What is the most efficient use of these funds? Studies from 2015 found that when communities increase spending on local schools, student test scores, graduation rates, future salaries, and graduate economic […]]]>

Anyone who follows the elections in her local community is familiar with the heated debate over public school spending. What funding do schools need? What is the most efficient use of these funds? Studies from 2015 found that when communities increase spending on local schools, student test scores, graduation rates, future salaries, and graduate economic mobility all increase, confirming the hunches. popular. Research by economist Peter Blair, assistant professor at the Graduate School of Education, now offers new insights into types school spending matters most to families and provides communities with a way to measure whether these spending are at optimal levels.

Blair and his colleagues Patrick Bayer of Duke University and Kenneth Whaley of the University of Houston have found a way to shed light on these questions by analyzing house prices. Previous studies have shown that local public school spending is capitalized positively in housing prices, meaning families are willing to ‘vote with their feet’ and spend more on homes in school districts that invest. more in education. At the same time, property taxes are negatively capitalized in house prices: at constant school expenses, the more property taxes rise, the more house prices fall.

Since debates over funding schools tend to be fiercely partisan, Blair says he has deliberately chosen to study education through the prism of house prices, which he sees as neutral territory. “There is broad agreement,” he says. “Everyone, regardless of their political affiliation, cares about house prices. “

He and his colleagues reviewed housing price data from the Federal Housing Finance Agency as well as school financing data from the National Center for Education Statistics, which included teacher salaries, spending investment and construction and student demographics. The researchers also focused on schools in states that passed court-imposed financial reforms between 1990 and 2015. These reforms used block grants or property tax changes to equalize spending per student in school districts. This provided a useful sample of districts that allowed Blair and his colleagues to compare the effects of different amounts and types of funding, as well as the impacts of amended property tax laws, and establish precisely what has caused the change in housing prices.

Their statistical analysis found that each 1 percent increase in a school district‘s spending increased local home prices by 0.95 percent. More importantly, every 1 percent spent on teacher salaries increased house prices by 2 percent. Blair was surprised at the magnitude of this effect. “School expenses for teachers are by far the most important factor in housing prices,” he explains. By comparison, spending on infrastructure doesn’t seem to have as much of an impact: new or upgraded facilities seem less important to homebuyers, but “that doesn’t mean if you’re in a school district where schools are falling.” ruined, you shouldn’t spend more for it, ”Blair adds. “It just indicates that on average, the place where we need an injection of resources is dedicated to teachers. “

This discovery led researchers to the following question: Across the country, spending on teachers effective? Blair says economists have been grappling for over 80 years with whether spending on public goods (from public schools to streetlights) can be delivered efficiently or at optimal levels, meaning residents pay taxes. that they are willing to tolerate receiving. the services they want. Perhaps this is why non-wage spending, for example on investment projects such as a new athletics stadium, does not give the same boost to house prices: such spending is less important to people. residents. In fact, capital projects are often funded by bonds, which future property taxes, and therefore are likely to lower housing prices.

Blair and colleagues found that among communities benefiting from a tax-funded increase in teacher salaries, a subsequent increase in house prices signaled that spending for teachers had been inefficiently low. “Households were prepared to have higher taxes in order to have better funded schools,” he explains. Spending on teachers can take many forms – recruiting more experienced educators, for example, or increasing the number of faculty members, thereby reducing student-teacher ratios – but new research shows these measures are effective, says Blair. : “There is evidence in the newspaper that these two things cause house prices to rise. Ideally, communities continue to increase the amount they spend on a public good until a gradual increase in taxes spent on them has no impact on house prices, he adds. If house prices fall, it may be a sign that homeowners do not like the increase in local spending.

Blair believes this research provides policymakers with a new tool to advocate for more investment in public education, especially compensation for educators. “This is the kind of policy that households want,” he says. “That’s what they show us. They choose to live in places that spend more money on teachers.


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EFF in the tenth circuit: the first amendment protects the discourse on off-campus social networks of public school students https://fpru.org/eff-in-the-tenth-circuit-the-first-amendment-protects-the-discourse-on-off-campus-social-networks-of-public-school-students/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 19:35:30 +0000 https://fpru.org/eff-in-the-tenth-circuit-the-first-amendment-protects-the-discourse-on-off-campus-social-networks-of-public-school-students/ EFF has filed a brief friend in the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in favor of the right of public school students to speak out outside of class or after school hours, including on social media. We argued that Supreme Court case law made it clear that the First Amendment rarely […]]]>

EFF has filed a brief friend in the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in favor of the right of public school students to speak out outside of class or after school hours, including on social media. We argued that Supreme Court case law made it clear that the First Amendment rarely allows schools to punish students for their off-campus social media speech, including offensive speech.

In that case, C1.G. v. Siegfried, a student and friends visited a thrift store on a Friday night. The student took a photo of his friends wearing wigs and hats, including a hat that looked like a WWII foreign military hat. Intending to be funny, the student posted on Snapchat a photo of his friends with an offensive caption related to violence against Jews (and deleted it a few hours later). The school suspended and ultimately expelled the student.

The EFF brief argued in favor of the expelled student, focusing on the Supreme Court’s strong protection for students’ rights of expression in his decision this summer in Mahanoy v. BL There, the court explained that three “characteristics” of off-campus student discourse diminish a school’s power to regulate student expression. Even more powerfully, “from the perspective of the student speaker, off-campus speech regulations, when combined with on-campus speech regulations, include all speeches made by a student during the full day of speech. 24 hours “. Mahanoy clarifies that the long-standing right of students to express themselves on campus, except in limited circumstances, as recognized by the Supreme Court in its 1969 decision in Tinker v. Monks, is even stronger off campus — and that includes, like the Mahanoy The court said “unpopular expression”.

Our brief also urged the appeals court to reject a special rule for social media. The school argued, and the district court accepted, that the unique nature of the sharing and accessibility of Internet speech – that it can easily find its way onto campus – warrants greater authority over the Internet. school on student discourse on off-campus social networks. Dismissing this argument is especially important given that social media is a central way for young people to express themselves, connect with others and engage in advocacy on issues that matter to them; and takes into account the Supreme Court’s concern over the “24 hour full day” regulations.

In 2018, 95 percent of American teens reported that they have access to a smartphone, and 45% said they use the Internet “almost constantly”. Students and young people are using social media to rally support for political candidates, advocate for racial justice, and organize around issues such as gun control, climate change and, most recently, COVID- 19. For example, when a student at the University of Alabama Zoie Terry became one of the first female students in the United States to be quarantined, her posts about the experience on TikTok led to significant changes in university policy, including the medical monitoring of quarantined students.

Students must have an outlet for their expression, free from the censorious eye of public school officials. We hope the tenth circuit applies Mahanoy appropriately and rescind the student’s expulsion in this case.


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Ryan van Drecht is running for public school trustee https://fpru.org/ryan-van-drecht-is-running-for-public-school-trustee/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 17:37:56 +0000 https://fpru.org/ryan-van-drecht-is-running-for-public-school-trustee/ Content of the article Ryan van Drecht will run for public school trustee in this year’s municipal elections. Content of the article Van Drecht is a recent graduate of the University of Alberta and has worked in Grande Prairie as a mechanical engineer for two years. Van Drecht joined the race for school commissioner because […]]]>

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Ryan van Drecht will run for public school trustee in this year’s municipal elections.

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Van Drecht is a recent graduate of the University of Alberta and has worked in Grande Prairie as a mechanical engineer for two years.

Van Drecht joined the race for school commissioner because he is interested in serving his community, and also because he learned that initially there were hardly any candidates against the incumbents. While many more challengers have entered the race ahead of the nomination deadline, he is excited to take the plunge.

“I thought it would be a good opportunity,” said van Drecht, adding “one thing that I enjoy is listening to people and trying to determine if there is some sort of compromise available.”

One of the first agendas for van Drecht, if elected, is to help the board create a better working relationship with the people it is supposed to serve, including government, teachers, students and parents.

“I want to try to improve the functionality of the board as a whole, so that it is able to solve any problem that arises,” said van Drecht.

During the election campaign, one of the biggest issues van Drecht heard was the controversy over the school board‘s previous decision not to make masking mandatory in schools, which he said was “at odds. with room temperature “.

“I think there is some tension there and a relationship that needs to be mended,” van Drecht said.

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Along with the issues regarding COVID, van Drecht is also attending many discussions regarding the proposed program, and he finds that these two issues seem to dominate the entire conversation.

“I see a common theme here, and there seems to be a mismatch between the local needs of the Grande Prairie School District,” said van Drecht, “and the direction the Government of Alberta is giving us.”

Van Drecht is keen to see changes in the controversial K-6 curriculum plan because of the over-emphasis on rote memorization and the assumptions he makes about learning.

“This is definitely the worst program I have read,” said van Drecht, “it looks like, [the kids] are basically glorified hard drives. In a sense, what they are evaluated on is their ability to memorize large amounts of information and regurgitate it with precision.

“What exactly do we think of when we think of a good education, because I don’t think that’s it,” van Drecht said.

Van Drecht wants to stand out from the rest of the field because of its emphasis on long-term planning.

“How can we improve the functioning of this board and the school district as a whole in the future? Said van Drecht.

Van Drecht also believes his age will set him apart from the rest of his peers and considers his recent experience in the education system to be an asset when tackling difficult topics.

“I think this is definitely going to come in handy when I sit down and chat with students or newly graduated teachers and substitutes,” van Drecht said.

For more information on van Drecht and his campaign, voters are invited to check out his Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/TrusteeRyanV/

The day of the municipal elections is October 18. The candidates for the post of Public School Trustee in alphabetical order are: Ray Buziak, Ryan van Drecht, Jheri Lynn Drover, James, Fletcher, Sydney Fletcher, Karna Germsheid, Alex Innes, Debra Jones, Chris Johnston, Troy Johnston, Donna Koch, Paulette L. Kurylo, Adrianne Larsen, Rob Martin, Ainsley Miller, Tammy Monro, Joan Nellis, Andre Ouellette and Joe Redhead.


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California to demand free menstrual products in public school and college bathrooms https://fpru.org/california-to-demand-free-menstrual-products-in-public-school-and-college-bathrooms/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 04:52:30 +0000 https://fpru.org/california-to-demand-free-menstrual-products-in-public-school-and-college-bathrooms/ SACRAMENTO – Public schools and colleges in California must stock their toilets with free menstrual products under a bill signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday. The move comes as women’s rights activists lobby across the country for affordable access to sanitary napkins, tampons and other items. California’s latest effort builds on a 2017 law […]]]>
SACRAMENTO – Public schools and colleges in California must stock their toilets with free menstrual products under a bill signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday.

The move comes as women’s rights activists lobby across the country for affordable access to sanitary napkins, tampons and other items.

California’s latest effort builds on a 2017 law requiring low-income schools in disadvantaged areas to provide students with free menstrual products.

It expands the law to include grades 6 through 12, community colleges, and the California State University and University of California systems, starting in the 2022-2023 school year. He encourages private schools and colleges to follow suit.

“Our biology doesn’t always send an advanced warning when we’re about to start menstruating, which often means we have to stop whatever we’re doing and face a period,” the Democratic MP said. Cristina Garcia on her legislation. “Just as toilet paper and paper towels are provided in virtually every public washroom, menstrual products should be as well.”

Several other states were considering or required free menstrual products in public schools, according to advocacy group Women’s Voices for the Earth. Purdue University in Indiana last year decided to offer free feminine hygiene products in campus bathrooms.

“California joins a growing number of states leading the way in demonstrating that menstrual equity is a human rights issue,” advocacy group PERIOD said in a statement. “No student should waste learning time because of their rules, period.”

California also previously repealed a tax on menstrual products that cost women about $ 20 million per year.

According to Women’s Voices for the Earth, more than half of states still tax menstrual products as “luxury” items. Around the world, many countries have eliminated these taxes, including Great Britain, Australia, Canada and India.

Copyright © 2021 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved.


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New York City to phase out gifted and talented public school programs critics call racist https://fpru.org/new-york-city-to-phase-out-gifted-and-talented-public-school-programs-critics-call-racist/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:53:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/new-york-city-to-phase-out-gifted-and-talented-public-school-programs-critics-call-racist/ New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday unveiled a plan to phase out gifted and talented programs for elementary school students that many educators say discriminate against black and Hispanic children enrolled in the larger public school system from the country. It will be replaced by a program called “Brilliant NYC” which will […]]]>

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday unveiled a plan to phase out gifted and talented programs for elementary school students that many educators say discriminate against black and Hispanic children enrolled in the larger public school system from the country.

It will be replaced by a program called “Brilliant NYC” which will expand the pool of students for whom accelerated learning is offered, and not limit it to only kindergarten students who have performed well on an optional exam that will allow them to learn. set out to attend preschool in town. elite colleges and high schools.

“The era of judging 4-year-olds based on a single test is over,” de Blasio said in a statement. “Brilliant NYC will provide accelerated education to tens of thousands of kids, as opposed to just a few. Every child in New York City deserves to reach their full potential, and this new fair model gives them that chance. “

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks at New Bridges Elementary School in Brooklyn ahead of the schools reopening on August 19, 2020.Jeenah Moon / Pool via Reuters file

De Blasio’s announcement, which came in the dying days of his last term at City Hall, sent shockwaves across New York City that are likely to be felt in public school systems across the country struggling with similar types of racial disparities.

The new plan comes two years after a diversity working group in New York recommended removing most of the selective programs that use test scores and other criteria to determine class placement, and that have helped create a two-tier school system where 75 percent of students in the programs gifted and talented were either white or of Asian descent, while students who did not make this cut were relegated to lower schools with fewer resources.

Currently, the program admits only 2,500 pupils per year out of 65,000 preschools in the city.

Critics, including some fellow Democrats, were quick to rush de Blasio’s decision.

“Gifted and talented programs have been an integral option for generations of schoolchildren,” tweeted State Senator John Liu, a Democrat from Queens who chairs a panel on New York City schools. “@BilldeBlasio has promised intensive public engagement on this, but now wants a total elimination.”

A senior official from the National Association for Gifted Children, which advocates for gifted and talented programs, said “equity in the education of the gifted needs to be addressed,” but de Blasio’s plan fails.

“While we support several aspects of Brilliant NYC, such as increased teacher training and the elimination of a single gifted identification exam, we are not convinced that accelerated learning itself will also meet the challenges. needs of our gifted learners, ”Lauri Kirsch, President of the NAGC Board of Directors said. “Going forward, I hope the New York City Mayor and Department of Education will reconsider this plan and keep the best interests of our gifted children in mind.”

Asian American activists have been among the most vocal opponents of dismantling the gifted and talented programs, which they see as a way for the community to move forward.

“The elimination of the G&T program is just another example of this administration’s continued assault on high performing students and accelerated learners,” said Yiatin Chu, co-chair of PLACE NYC, a New York City advocacy group.

Some parents of public school students have also expressed concern.

Marcia Benjamin-Charles, 44, a mother of two at Brooklyn Public Schools, said she feared de Blasio’s move could lead to an exodus of bright students to charter schools.

“I am African American, and a lot of African American children now go to charter schools,” she said.

Benjamin-Charles said she plans to transfer her eldest, who is now 20, to a charter school after the gifted and talented classes he took until grade 4 were cut short at his school. But she ended up keeping him there and he finished second in his class.

“I was a student in a public school,” said Benjamin-Charles, who works as a manager of transitional care. “I shot well. I want to give my children the same education.

But Sok Svay of Queens, whose 14-year-old daughter is a public school student, said de Blasio’s new plan would level the playing field. She said while her daughter is thriving though she won’t not part of a gifted and talented program, basing children’s futures on their performance on a test taken at age 4 is unfair to parents who do not have the time or resources to prepare their children to that. exam.

“It’s really an exclusion because when you think of many immigrant parents who can’t read or don’t have time to go through this whole process, their children are likely to miss better programs because they will simply be excluded from it. understanding the process, ”said Svay, a Cambodian refugee who grew up in the Bronx. “Class segregation, which leads to racial segregation, must end. “

As part of de Blasio’s plan, students enrolled in the gifted and talented programs will stay there. But the programs will no longer exist for new kindergarten students next fall.

Instead of the much-criticized entrance exam, the city will determine which third-graders should be placed in accelerated classes by assessing their schoolwork and getting advice from their teachers.

The city will also train all kindergarten teachers to provide accelerated learning in areas ranging from robotics and computer coding to community organizing.

These deemed gifted students will no longer be separated from their peers. Instead, they will spend several periods a day working on specific subjects with specially trained teachers before returning to their regular classes.

The move also puts de Blasio’s likely successor, Eric Adams, in a bind. A Democrat in a predominantly Democratic city, Adams campaigned on a promise to expand the existing gifted and talented program to low-income neighborhoods and it would be up to him to implement this new program if elected.

“Eric will assess the plan and reserves the right to implement policies based on the needs of students and parents, should he become mayor,” Evan Thies, Adams campaign spokesperson, told the New York Times. “It is clear that the Ministry of Education needs to improve the outcomes of children in low income areas. “

Adam’s Republican rival Curtis Sliwa said he was getting crash courses at his college in Brooklyn and that New Yorkers should have “more gifted and talented programs, not less.”

“My younger sons tried to get into the gifted and talented program, but they didn’t qualify because there weren’t enough slots,” he said in an email.

New York is one of the most diverse cities in the country. Corn the Civil Rights Project at the University of California at Los Angeles, reported in June that the city’s public schools are the most segregated in the country.

“Two-thirds of a century after the Supreme Court declared separate schools ‘inherently unequal,’ New York is a national epicenter of racial segregation in unequal schools,” wrote Gary Orfield, co-director of the Civil Rights Project.



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Teacher shortage in NSW public schools likely to last five years https://fpru.org/teacher-shortage-in-nsw-public-schools-likely-to-last-five-years/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://fpru.org/teacher-shortage-in-nsw-public-schools-likely-to-last-five-years/ “Historically, under-bidding has not been a problem and it is not something that we are used to actively managing at the level that will be necessary to meet our future needs,” said the presentation. “It will be a challenge to take on more active stewardship of this system. “ “If we don’t fill the supply […]]]>

“Historically, under-bidding has not been a problem and it is not something that we are used to actively managing at the level that will be necessary to meet our future needs,” said the presentation. “It will be a challenge to take on more active stewardship of this system. “

“If we don’t fill the supply shortages now, we’re going to run out of teachers over the next five years.

Confidential document from the Ministry of Education

As late as July this year, briefing notes for Education Minister Sarah Mitchell ahead of a meeting of education ministers said: “New South Wales is facing to a significant and growing shortage of teachers ”.

NSW Teachers Federation President Angelo Gavrielatos said the government had hidden the true extent of the staffing crisis in schools. “It will get worse unless drastic measures are taken,” he said. “No one should doubt how serious this situation is for our children and teachers and for the future quality of education in New South Wales.”

The federation is about to start wage negotiations with the NSW government. He argues that the ministry will continue to fight to attract teachers unless it increases salaries beyond the 2.5% civil service salary cap and improves conditions.

“We need to make the profession more attractive through competitive salaries and realistic workloads if we are to address shortages and recruit a minimum of 11,000 additional teachers needed just to meet enrollment growth over the next decade. “said Mr. Gavrielatos.

However, a spokesperson for the NSW Department of Education said the information was out of date, the department had developed strategies to attract more teachers and the government was on track to keep its commitment to recruit 4,600 additional teachers over four years.

Ms Mitchell said the union’s allegations of a looming teacher crisis were “patently misleading and self-serving”. She said the government’s approach to increasing the supply of teachers was supported by research, based on teacher feedback.

“Ensuring that we have the best teachers in the right places is not secured by a fear campaign backed by bad data,” she said. “To find solutions, we asked the question of what is best for the students, and in this case, I’m afraid the union is not asking the same.”

The documents show the ministry had been aware of impending shortages since 2019, when an internal report in November warned that the best-case scenario was an overall supply gap within three years (end of 2022), but that was “A significant under-representation of reality. problem. ”By 2024, there would be a gap of 748 teachers in the public system alone, which would drop to 2,425 by 2025, he predicted.

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Another internal report, dated March 2020, said there would not be enough teachers entering the system beyond 2026. “This year [2020], aggregate excess supply available [of teachers] is already tight … By 2024 the surplus could be less than 2 percent of the workforce, and by 2026, [there is] likely to be a real supply gap, ”the report says.

A report said the salary cap and perceptions of a lack of teaching career paths “could hinder choices” to become a teacher. He also said declining wages compared to other professions had been a barrier to recruiting high performing students.

The documents proposed that targeting graduates while they are still in college, trying to attract professionals to a mid-career job change, and increasing the number of permanent positions could increase the number by around 300 per year. year.

The ministry spokesman said the government has committed $ 124.8 million over four years to a teacher supply strategy, which will change incentives for teachers to move to regions, attempt to facilitate transitions mid-career towards teaching and poaching STEM teachers from abroad.

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“The NSW government is working on a number of initiatives to provide a sustainable supply of quality teachers, including in critical subjects and locations, and is on track to deliver on its commitment to recruit 4,600 additional teachers over four years, ”he said.

The spokesperson said NSW teachers’ salaries were competitive nationally and internationally, with those at the top of the salary scale being paid $ 107,779. Beginning teachers are paid $ 72,263. Education is a four-year undergraduate degree or a two-year master’s degree.

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